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Centralized Deadlock Detection

As a first attempt, we can use a centralized deadlock detection algorithm and try to imitate the nondistributed algorithm. Although each machine maintains the resource graph for its own processes and resources, a central coordinator maintains the resource graph for the entire system (the union of all the individual graphs). When the coordinator detects a cycle, it kills off one process to break the deadlock.

Unlike the centralized case, where all the information is automatically available in the right place, in a distributed system it has to be sent there explicitly. Each machine maintains the graph for its own processes and resources. Several possibilities exist for getting it there. First, whenever an arc is added or deleted from the resource graph, a message can be sent to the coordinator providing the update. Second, periodically, every process can send a list of arcs added or deleted since the previous update. This method requires fewer messages than the first one. Third, the coordinator can ask for information when it needs it.


Distributed operating systems

Fig. 3-23. (a) Initial resource graph for machine 0. (b) Initial resource graph for machine 1. (c) The coordinator's view of the world. (d) The situation after the delayed message.


Unfortunately, none of these methods work well. Consider a system with processes A and B running on machine 0, and process C running on machine 1. Three resources exist: R, S, and T. Initially, the situation is as shown in Fig. 3-23(a) and (b): A holds S but wants R, which it cannot have because B is using it; C has T and wants S, too. The coordinator's view of the world is shown in Fig. 3-23(c). This configuration is safe. As soon as B finishes, A can get R and finish, releasing S for C.

After a while, B releases R and asks for T, a perfectly legal and safe swap. Machine 0 sends a message to the coordinator announcing the release of R, and machine 1 sends a message to the coordinator announcing the fact that B is now waiting for its resource, T. Unfortunately, the message from machine 1 arrives first, leading the coordinator to construct the graph of Fig. 3-23(d). The coordinator incorrectly concludes that a deadlock exists and kills some process. Such a situation is called a false deadlock. Many deadlock algorithms in distributed systems produce false deadlocks like this due to incomplete or delayed information.

One possible way out might be to use Lamport's algorithm to provide global time. Since the message from machine 1 to the coordinator is triggered by the request from machine 0, the message from machine 1 to the coordinator will indeed have a later timestamp than the message from machine 0 to the coordinator. When the coordinator gets the message from machine 1 that leads it to suspect deadlock, it could send a message to every machine in the system saying: "I just received a message with timestamp T which leads to deadlock. If anyone has a message for me with an earlier timestamp, please send it immediately." When every machine has replied, positively or negatively, the coordinator will see that the arc from R to B has vanished, so the system is still safe. Although this method eliminates the false deadlock, it requires global time and is expensive. Furthermore, other situations exist where eliminating false deadlock is much harder.


3.5.1. Distributed Deadlock Detection | Distributed operating systems | Distributed Deadlock Detection



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